Brattishing

Sometimes the most beautiful designs are articulate and individual solutions to problems.

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A slice of Minster

March 01, 2016

Another favourite pic of mine - I like it because of what it conceals rather than reveals. I like the shape and form. York is full of views like this.
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Minster in the Mist

March 01, 2016

I love this pic I took of York Minster a few years back - I was in the right place at the right time. I took it with my iPhone as the morning light started to arm wrestle the mist into submission.

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Genius Loci: Ashby de la Zouch

February 28, 2016

Ashby de la Zouch is bursting with character. 

If the place were a novel - the principal chapters would reveal a richly dramatic storyline. The drama lies along the principal axis (Market Street) where medieval structures have been upstaged by Georgian and Regency frontages.



The main dramatic personae are the pinnacled towers of the ancient St. Helen's church and the early C20th Our Lady of Lourdes - adorned with herringbone sheet lead roof.



Fallen on hard times - the stately Royal Hotel of 1827 - stands proudly beyond the main townscape but scarred by changing fortunes.



Along Kilwardby Street - A striking scene of Victorian prosperity interspersed by a shockingly modern looking parapeted Georgian frontage. This type, surely a source for later modernist architecture.

And there are wonderfully subtle sub-plots to the main storybook that is Ashby.

The plan and form of the burgage plots still remains beyond Market Street with snakingly elongated buildings of industrial character.

The survival of the industrial works or 'courts' also still apparent in the typology.



The organic and layered growth of the town and its raw beauty still apparent.

The final denouement sees the ravaged Castle survive a sophoclean storyline.



All this wonderful mix of style, texture, colour and plan I've tried to capture in the Genius Loci: Ashby de la Zouch print.



I'd love to know what you think - you can see all editions of the print here.

Make it your place:



Do you know of, or live in a place that deserves capturing in a Genius Loci print?

If so - drop me a line via Contact above, or use the hashtag #geniuslociprint on social media to bring your place to my attention.

I'll be recording all the suggestions and visiting some of the suggested destinations.

I am @fotofacade on Twitter or you can post a suggestion on the dedicated Facebook Page.


If you don't want to miss out on any of the places chosen subscribe here.

 

These articles are designed to give added value, depth and context to your Door Print.

The two yellow doors circled in the Door Print above date from 1900 and are from a house designed by architect Edgar Wood

Wood was an architect from the north west of England who produced some remarkably radical buildings which pre-cursored modernism. 

The 1900 building in Middleton north of Manchester is unique in that it is a sort of hybrid.

A traditional approach to house building but with the elements of modernism rooted within it. Clean simple lines and the use of simple materials (such as brick) as decoration.

Here are some more images of the doors and building in context:

Check out all editions of the Door Print 

For more insight into the doors in the Door Print head over to 'The Vestibule' in the main menu. 

Like architecture, art and photography? You can join the conversation by subscribing here or Liking the dedicated Facebook Page here

 

Halcyon Days in York

February 18, 2016

Dare lift your eyes and you'll be richly entertained by a vibrant and sometimes sensual architectural landscape

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The SPAB Front Door

February 17, 2016

I not only included this front door in the Door Print because of its aesthetics, but also because of the work that goes on behind it.
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Not only are such places full of jaw dropping HDR stretching, UV filter cracking vistas - they are also perfectly formed jewel boxes with the embryonic strands of 20th century design.

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A modern design - rooted in the past
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